Academic articles

Here are some favorite academic articles. Unfortunately, many of them will require you have access to the databases, due to copyright restrictions.

There are many ways to scientific fraud

There are many ways to scientific fraud

An entertaining version of it was published ten years ago, by Neuroskeptic at: http://neuroskeptic.blogspot.com/2010/11/9-circles-of-scientific-hell.html and since then, also as an article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1745691612459519 as both can be...

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Tweet to increase our citation scores?

Tweet to increase our citation scores?

Citation scores are berated as being a poor predictor of article quality.. but still the best one available. Scholars are also often judged on citation scores. So the question of how to increase ones citation score is salient. The most important is of course to...

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Advice through a PhD, from Oliver Williamson

Advice through a PhD, from Oliver Williamson

We all know our PhD journey has been unique, special, just like the snowflakes we are. Reading the advice Oliver Williamson gave his phd students, makes me smile, it is advice I should have got during my journey. It would have been perfectly tailored to me. The essay,...

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The importance of stupidity in scientific research

The importance of stupidity in scientific research

I think the Lego Gradstudent is brilliant! Very dark humour, but ohh so funny, especially if and when you feel a little down during your PhD journey. The creator made a video about the "impostor syndrome", that many experience at times. To watch it: I recently read an...

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A manifesto for reproducible science

A manifesto for reproducible science

There are ohh-so many ways to mess up when conducting research, leading either intentionally or unintentionally, to false results. Open science, where every effort is made to allow others to check your work (put very simply) is on the rise. Here is a great article on...

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Free access to research articles

Free access to research articles

Academic research is contingent on building on past findings, much published in academic journals. While researchers get nothing from the journals when they submit their work (indeed, some pay for the privilege to get published), it can cost a fortune to access the...

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How to review for a journal

How to review for a journal

Reviewing for the first time us daunting.. bit is a great learning opportunity and is part of the research life. Learning how to do so as constructively as possible is worthwhile. Here are some resources. This one gives some attitudes to have, structure to consider...

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Concept clarity

Not read the article in full yet, though this article on concept clarity strikes a chord, having read a lot of articles where concepts change, and are mixed from one article to the next. Believe it is worth studying before writing up my next paper. :)...

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“Interesting” research

There is a focus on producing so-called interesting research. This essay: Organizational sciences’ obsession with “that’s interesting!” Consequences and an alternative  by Madan M. Pillutla and Stefan Thau They lay out an argument for why interesting findings and...

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What is a “Meta Analysis”

Meta analysis' are often considered the gold standard for studies; a single study is never conclusive due to potential errors in design or data, whereas when results from many studies are systematically analyzed, they can be. Here is a YouTube series that goes through...

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Endogeneity… What it is, and potential sources

Endogeneity has received attention in the past decade, as a significant source of bias in results reported in a wide variety of studies. Papers can now be desk rejected by top journals if there is reason to believe there may be endogeneity at play. Endogeneity refers...

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On doing better science – Leader by Antonakis

John Antonakis is the new editor of Leaderhip Quarterly, and in his first leader, he lays out what he sees as important going forward, and possible perils in the field of leadership research. Quote from the article: Because of the incentive structures that...

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“Why people prefer unequal societies”

In thier article, Starmans, Sheskin and Bloom presents the compelling argument that most people are concerned about fairness when it comes to distribution of resources, and prefer unequal outcomes, as long as there is a merit or needs based reason for the inequality....

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The natural selection of bad science

This paper lays out the argument that flawed research design, methods and analysis (all be it unintentional) will yield results in greater volume and that are more novel and surprising; and thus, also greater rate of publishing. As publishing is a key factor in...

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How should academics be evaluated?

Great article titled: "“Am I Famous Yet?” Judging Scholarly Merit in Psychological Science. An Introduction" by Robert J. Sternberg; which discusses the various metrics used, their shortcomings and what changes in how academics will be judged in the future. A good...

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How to attend a conference

While interesting to go, my first academic conference did not exactly give me high returns on the investment. Did I "do it" in the best way possible? Definitely not. This article gives a quick summary of what I should been doing 🙂 In short: Define your goals Do your...

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Building Effective Networks

Herminia Ibarra is a professor of Organizational Behavior at INSEAD, and ranked as one of the most influential management thinkers, on one list as number 8.  http://thinkers50.com/t50-ranking/2015-2/ In the linked 15 minute video, she presents her thoughts on...

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Friends with academic benefits

Friends with academic benefits

This article studies college students, from a sociological perspective, using network theory analysis and qualitative work. The key findings: Student’s social networks fall into three types: tight knitters, compartmentalizes and samplers. Tight Knitters: all friends...

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Research at Google on what makes teams effective

Research at Google on what makes teams effective

Research into team effectiveness at Google has shown that the single most important factor is the extent team members feel psychologically safe. Second order of importance shows that team member dependability, role clarity, meaning of work and real impact of work also...

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Social Ties in Academia: A Friend is a Treasure

My takeaway from the article: Encourage my two advisers to become editors of prestigious journals! This extract from the conclusion says a lot: The social effect is particularly relevant for former PhD students and university colleagues of the editor; for instance,...

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