Latest posts

Things about a PhD nobody told you about

Great talk on aspects of a Ph.D. noone talk about. (My notes on what was said below) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAKsQf77nHU There are 740 000 students enrolled in a phd in Europe. 2/1000 are in a phd program. (see below for statistics)   7 things nobody told me...

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Bibliometric review

NOTE: this post is very much under development, and is largely just notes for myself.  What is a bibliographic reveiw? An effective way to synthesize a large body of research, using quantitative analysis, with network logic underpinning much of it. What types of...

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Free speech and acceptable norms

This podcast episode of Hidden Brain, on the topic of free speech, uses research during and after the Trump presidential campaign, and classic Bandura research, to  show how it can change perceptions of what constitutes acceptable thoughts and opinions. It further...

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“Interesting” research

There is a focus on producing so-called interesting research. This essay: Organizational sciences’ obsession with “that’s interesting!” Consequences and an alternative  by Madan M. Pillutla and Stefan Thau They lay out an argument for why interesting findings and...

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Nvivo for litterature review

This post is a work in progress, as I try using Nvivo to get a systematic overview of my field of study; and where I store links and resources I have found useful. A complete post will follow when I have a conclusion (of whether to stop, or go on :)) It might be...

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Advice for novice (and not so novice) teachers

One of my all time favorite MOOCs was taught by Paul Bloom, on the topic of Moral Psychology. He has also written several books, such as "Against Empathy". Via Twitter today, he shared some advice for those who are about to start teaching; as they were shared through...

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What is a “Meta Analysis”

Meta analysis' are often considered the gold standard for studies; a single study is never conclusive due to potential errors in design or data, whereas when results from many studies are systematically analyzed, they can be. Here is a YouTube series that goes through...

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On doing better science – Leader by Antonakis

John Antonakis is the new editor of Leaderhip Quarterly, and in his first leader, he lays out what he sees as important going forward, and possible perils in the field of leadership research. Quote from the article: Because of the incentive structures that...

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Some may enjoy reading this..

..and spend a couple of minutes studying the graph. A graph showing what people think of when using unspecific terms like: "some", "a few", "many", as well as various types of probabilities. Rather interesting.. as well as a short discussion on what to do with...

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“Why people prefer unequal societies”

In thier article, Starmans, Sheskin and Bloom presents the compelling argument that most people are concerned about fairness when it comes to distribution of resources, and prefer unequal outcomes, as long as there is a merit or needs based reason for the inequality....

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Better writing by large and small cuts

Giants in the field of how to write well recommend brutal editing of ones own text; often said as: "murder your darlings". The advice is sound. A rule of thumb may be that one should have half the words left of the original draft. Some key points: Cut any parts that...

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The role of narratives in how information spreads

When theorizing about the world and how information is spread, it is easy to assume that better information will prevail, and, when conducting social network analysis, that all information is equal, it is all about the structure and characteristics of the node. This...

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The futuRe of statistics.. is R…

It is the most up to date software; it will make you more attractive on the job market; and enable you to do any analysis from one program. The two (linked) articles explain why, and give a great list of resources for how to learn, including Coursera : Read more at:...

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The natural selection of bad science

This paper lays out the argument that flawed research design, methods and analysis (all be it unintentional) will yield results in greater volume and that are more novel and surprising; and thus, also greater rate of publishing. As publishing is a key factor in...

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Selection bias and the use of success stories

While it is obvious when stated, it is still a sad fact that the popular business press continues to write hero stories and generalize from business successes. This article from HBR is a quick introduction to why this can lead one to draw the wrong conclusions....

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